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A Conversation with Prof. William Childs, professor emeritus of Art and Archaeology, Princeton University, and director of the Princeton Cyprus Expedition excavations in Polis Chrysochous. November 15, 2012

November 15, 2012

Tonight I’ll be speaking to Professor Childs one of the Co-curators of the exhibition currently on display at the Princeton University Art Museum entitled: City of Gold: Tomb and Temple in Ancient Cyprus. Below is some copy about the exhibition from the Museum’s website.

This exhibition explores the history and archaeology of Polis Chrysochous, a town in the Republic of Cyprus that is the site of the ancient city of Marion and its successor city, Arsinoe.

Celebrating the conclusion of more than two decades of excavations at Polis by the Princeton Department of Art and Archaeology, under the direction of Professor William A. P. Childs, City of Gold will feature 110 objects lent by the Cypriot Department of Antiquities, the British Museum, and the Musée du Louvre, including splendid gold jewelry and a rare marble statue of a kouros, or nude male youth.

The exhibition will be at the museum until Sunday, January 20, 2013, and is well worth the trip to Princeton to see it. In fact I would suggest making the museum a day trip. It is a wonderful museum that offers a superb collection of artworks.

Special thanks go out to Erin R. Firestone and especially, Achilleas Antoniades, Ambassador (Ret.) for their help in making this interview possible.

For more information about the museum—click here.

For specific information about the exhibition from the museum’s website—click here.

For more information about the Department of Art and Archaeology at Princeton—click here.

For a link to a very impressive array of pictures entitled: POLIS CHRYSOCHOUS · CYPRUS · TWENTY YEARS OF EXCAVATION—click here.

For more information concerning the book: City of Gold—click here.

For the artdaily.org article about the exhibition—click here.

CLICK hear to listen to our conversation recorded on November 15, 2012.

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